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SLACK TIDE

Performance (2017 - Present)

Slack water, or the stand of the tide, is a period of time when tidal water is not moving. It’s the resting place of high tide, or low tide, before the tidal stream reverses. On the Minas Basin in the Bay of Fundy, the slack water is approximately 50 minutes in length. And it is deeply felt. After a change in water level of some 40-60 feet in six hours, the water becomes completely unstressed and there’s no movement either way in the tidal stream.

While most take advantage of the stand to accomplish lots of movement and activity, such as diving and fishing, my inclination is to visit the water’s edge, and mirror it’s still point. Over time, my body leaves an imprint in the land, which remains a full tidal cycle.

The slack tide is a space of transformation through embracing change and intimacy with the water.

  Imprint of my body in the sand at the slack water edge. Photo by Lindsay Dobbin.

Imprint of my body in the sand at the slack water edge. Photo by Lindsay Dobbin.









Top photo by Linseed.